Biologically Inspired Behaviors – Following the Turtles

Ok, so Wikipedia says remoras sometimes hitch a ride on turtles.  So where to the turtles go?  Sage found us a couple of links.

Here's one website: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/datasets/detail/316 . You can see the turtles leaving the east coast and heading east in the Gulf Stream.  After rounding the tail of the Grand Banks, the tracks bifurcate.

Here's another.  The track of a Leatherback Sea Turtle named Jamur.

http://www.signalsofspring.net/maps/phyto_map_2006.cfm?who=Leatherback&DATA_YEAR=2008&day=06302007month&open=yes&NAMES=Jamur,second

Jamar travelled from the Tail of the Grand Banks to Spain in about 4 to 4.5 months.  Do they swim faster than gliders?   Here's the link to a paper on the Leatherbacks they instrumented in the Caribbean.

http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/reprint/205/23/3689.pdf

Scott Eckert found that the Leatherbacks rarely stopped swimming, that their second most common behavior was a high speed sustained swim for hours at a time at speeds around 75 cm/sec.  Looks like a Turtle is about 2.5 times faster than a Glider.  

The image above also plots the turtle track on the ocean color image, with Jamur appearing to like that Chlorophyll front.  Guess we'll start plotting the global Chlorophyll and try to follow the turtles.

 

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