Where are the Currents Going?

So today our task was to calculate and plot the heat transport using both the North/South velocity values and the East/West velocity values for the HyCOM data. We started with quick lesson of how to use simple math functions in MATLAB and were then able to take these values and learn to plot them.

East/West Transport

This is a plot of the East and West heat transport of the HyCOM model versus depth. East is in the positive direction and West is in the negative direction. The upper 1000 meters shows mostly transport west with a maximum value of about 0.75 degrees C meters per second. The depths below 1000 meters show little to no transport.

North/South Transport

This is a plot of North and South heat transport of the HyCOM model versus depth. North is in the positive direction and South is in the negative direction. The upper 1000 meters shows a positive velocity with a maximum at the surface of about 4.5 degrees C meters per second. Below the upper 1000 meters the current velocity is about zero.

Speed

This is a plot of the overall speed versus depth. Speed was calculated by taking the square root of the product of the square of the North/South velocity and adding it to the square of the East/West velocity. Speed is at a maximum near the surface at about 0.175 meters per second.

One Response to “Where are the Currents Going?”

  1. antonioramos Says:

    Great job team !!!

    the surface current field (< 30 m) is showing a narrow upper layer going east (global model outputs) at moderate speeds.

    However, it looks that the subsurface westerlies current field explains the disagreement (200-1000 m)!! If Cook promediates the current field at depth, resultant vector would be west directed since speed direction (intense) and layers affected have significant weight on the calcules..

    I would also plot the T vs salinity..It would give the opportunity to target the water masses at depth....
    greetings

    antonio

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